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Flash Movie Review: Bears

It happened during my first school field trip where we traveled to our city’s zoo. We were in the lion house and I remembered how the pungent smell hung in the still air. I felt I was inhaling musky cotton balls. The big cats were one of my favorite animals so it was worth the odor to be up close to them. While standing in front of one cage with a pacing male lion, a park attendant who was stationed by one of the main entrances announced to all the visitors they would have to remain in the lion house. The reason was one of the animals had escaped from their enclosure outside. It turned out it was one of the zoo’s star attractions, a large silverback gorilla. My classmates and I were nervously excited with all the commotion this caused throughout the crowd around us. Until the gorilla was captured we spent enough time in the lion house to see the animals being fed by park assistants. I recall how frightening it looked to me to see how the lions would attack their fleshy meal. Back then it made sense to me that the animals were in cages for our protection. Little did I know that the time would come where they were there for their protection. From directors Alastair Fothergill (Chimpanzee, Earth) and Keith Scholey (African Cats) this documentary followed one family of bears in Alaska for one year, from coming out of hibernation to preparing for its return. If for nothing else I have to tip my hat to the movie studio for providing exquisite footage of the bears’ habitat. I have visited Alaska and it was breathtaking to see. The camera work not only provided a true sense of the state, but the close-up work in filming the animals was wonderful. Personally I would have liked more facts about the life of the bears but that was just my own tastes. The studio wanted to make a film that was entertaining so I understood why they had John C. Reilly (We Need to Talk to Kevin, Carnage) as the narrator. Children will probably enjoy the humorous spin he put on the animals’ actions; I just happened to find it odd attaching human emotions to animals. Either way this film was an enjoyable experience. I will say my opinion about zoos has changed as an adult now; there are still ones out there that are simply prisons. Once you view this film you just might agree with me.

 

2 3/4 stars

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Flash Movie Review: Ted

If Kathy Griffin and Fozzie Bear had a child together, with Sarah Silverman and Andrew Dice Clay as the godparents, it would be Ted. Get ready to meet the most foul mouthed, funniest, furry teddy bear you have ever seen. The one liners came quickly and cut deeply; I could not help but laugh out loud. From a childhood wish that came true; John Bennett, played by Mark Wahlberg (Contraband, Date Night), and his talking teddy bear Ted were the best of friends. Even when John grew up, he and Ted were always there for each other. But as many of you know, when one of those two best friends falls in love, the dynamics of the friendship change. What would John do when his girlfriend Lori Collins, played by Mila Kunis (Black Swan, The Book of Eli), suggested it was time for Ted to move out? I won’t tell you, but what I will say is writer and director Seth MacFarlane (Family Guy-TV, American Dad-TV) created a gold mine of hilarious opportunities for laughter. In addition, he included a couple of themes for the viewers to mull over and possibly see if they could relate to them. Not only was Mila excellent in this movie; but Mark, who I have not been crazy about for some time, did a good job with his character. The goal of this comedy was to make the audience laugh and it succeeded. Just remember this bear is for adults only.

3 stars

Flash Movie Review: Brave

I do not have children; but if I had, my hope would be that I raised them to be free thinking, independent adults. My parents did, even if that was not their intentions. With that being the case, the story in this Pixar animated movie was a success. Princess Merida, voiced by Kelly MacDonald (No Country For Old Men, Nanny McPhee), was not going to grow up in the traditions of her mother Queen Elinor, voiced by Emma Thompson (Love Actually, Last Chance Harvey). Merida did not want her parents deciding who she could marry or how she should act. If only she could make her parents understand; the young princess was determined to break the traditions of her family. What I found different in this movie was the presence of a strong conflict between mother and daughter. In my opinion it was about time an animated movie dealt with deeper real life issues, yet still have the elements of a funny Disney movie. There was conflict, a challenge and a consequence; but for the broader audience, there were elements of humor, adventure and fantasy. It was like having a smorgasbord of emotions spread out for the viewer to sample. Visually this movie was stunning; the amount of detail was breathtaking. I was mesmerized by Merida’s beautiful, flaming red hair–it looked so real. Overall I felt the film had a split personality. There seemed to be a shift in focus that dulled the story for me, when the witch’s spell came into play. But like any relationship, one could not pick and chose the parts they liked. The entire movie experience for me was good, not great and I almost felt as if I had just been to Scotland.

 

2 3/4 stars

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