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Flash Movie Review: Bee Gees: How Do You Mend a Broken Heart

I WOULD ONLY NEED TO HEAR the first few notes of the song before images of me with my relatives would appear and I would be transported out of state. I would see myself by a lighthouse, overlooking a bay filled with sailboats. On July 4th, my relatives and I sat up on top of a hill so we could see over the surrounding houses and watch the fireworks that were exploding over the ocean in flashes of red, white and blue. Walking up a narrow staircase to see newborn babies sleeping in their handmade cradles is another fond memory that appears anytime I hear the song, “Massachusetts.” When I hear the song, “Nights on Broadway,” I immediately see me at a little food shop, quickly eating lunch, before I needed to get to my 2ndof 5 Broadway plays/musicals I had tickets for over the weekend. It was my first time there and I wanted to see as many things as I possibly could in the shortest amount of time. Seeing the theater marquees all lit up at night looked so much better in person than when I would see it on television. I would walk up and down the street, among the never-ending throngs of people, after leaving the theater because I wanted to soak up every experience possible, even if it included being jostled by the strangers walking to and fro.     THERE ARE SOME SONGS THAT SPEAK to us on a visceral level. We feel them inside of ourselves. There are some songs that I can listen to over and over and each time they will bring tears to my eyes; not necessarily the words as much as the sounds. What comes to my mind is one special song from a Broadway show that I have heard sung by multiple artists throughout the past decades. As soon as I hear the opening notes I start to tear up; it is immediate, before my mind even brings up whatever memory I have stored for it. Other songs tell us what we are feeling inside. “How Deep is Your Love” is one of those songs that hold a special place for me because of where I was at in a relationship during a particular time in my life. I can hear that song and visualize everything that was going on at the time, even down to what clothes I was wearing. Songs and music have such an important place in society and when a musical artist/group comes along to provide us with a multitude of songs that provide us with the markers for our life’s milestones, it truly is a gift.      THREE BROTHERS WITH PERFECT HARMONY HAD to navigate the issues that pop up among siblings while trying to get their feelings down on paper, that people would want to listen to. This film festival winner was literally a “blast from the past” for me. If one is not a fan of the Bee Gees’ music, they may not be as enamored as I was watching this documentary. Directed by Frank Marshall (Eight Below, Arachnophobia), I enjoyed the straightforward and orderly way he directed this picture. The use of archival footage was wonderful to watch, along with the variety of interviews included from such musical icons as Barry Gibb, Eric Clapton and Lulu. One of the surprise treats with watching this film was to see how the brothers created a song. I was fascinated with the recording footage as well as the corresponding concert footage. Whether one is a fan of the Bee Gees or not, there is no denying the Bee Gees were an important part of the musical landscape. This was a special movie watching experience because I was able to reminisce, sing along, learn something new and dance all within a couple of hours.

3 ½ stars

Flash Movie Review: Echo in the Canyon

EXCEPT FOR A COUPLE OF PARTICIPANTS WHO came with a friend none of us knew each other as we sat in the room, waiting for the instructor. The class each of us signed up for was a pottery class at the local community center. I was interested in pottery after seeing a potter at an art fair use a potter’s wheel to make a bowl. Watching him take a lump of clay, throw it onto the wheel and with some water and wooden utensils turn it into a beautiful etched bowl; it was mesmerizing to me, as it seemed to be pure magic. The instructor walked into the room and introduced himself to us. After explaining what he planned on us achieving, he asked us to come up and get some clay to work on for the day. With a quick succession of instructions and encouragement, the instructor asked us to talk to each other and left us to explore the possibilities with our clay. Before we turned on our potter’s wheels a member in the class asked what people were thinking of making with their clay. I planned on doing a bowl, but I was surprised by all the different comments. The creative ideas some of the participants expressed were fueling the conversations as we began our projects. It wasn’t until after the potter’s wheels were on and everyone’s lump of clay were halfway towards completion that I realized how exciting it was to be sitting in a room with engaged and creative “artists.”      THE CREATIVITY THAT CAME OUT OF THAT classroom could be seen by the variety of objects that each of us made and designed. I surprised myself by how quick I adapted to the environment. Almost all of the time, I need time to process a situation. As you can imagine being spontaneous is not something I do often, or maybe ever. When I have attended aerobic workshops, I always have a fear the presenter is going to ask us to break up into smaller groups and create an exercise routine. I am horrible in these types of scenarios. Now granted, I am aware and can feel the excitement participants experience while working together to create a routine to present in the workshop; I, on the other hand, experience an undercurrent of dread as I feel I am put on the spot to come up with something to share with the rest of the group. I do see the merits of working together to hash out ideas and there have been times where I do contribute once I feel more comfortable; however, I prefer sitting back and think over the variety of possibilities that begin to pop up into my head. This is why I totally understood what the musical artists were experiencing in this musical documentary.      DURING THE 1960S, A GROUP OF MUSICIANS found an area in Los Angeles that not only allowed but also encouraged them to take creative license with the music they were creating; it was called Laurel Canyon. This film festival winning movie had a variety of interviews and performances by Fiona Apple, Ringo Star, the Byrds, the Beach Boys, Eric Clapton, and The Mamas and the Papas. This film’s journey was “hosted” by Jakob Dylan who also performed. I did not mind him being the interviewer, but wished he had asked more questions of the musical artists instead of simply nodding his head. I enjoyed watching and listening to this documentary because of the historical significance and the personal stories being told. At times, I felt I was being taught a history lesson as I listened to the artists explain their connection and influences to the creation of a particular song; it was so cool. For music lovers in particular, this would be a worthwhile viewing experience. It reminded me of my younger days in winter when I would sing to myself “California Dreamin’” to stay warm.

 

3 ½ stars

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