Flash Movie Review: Made in Dagenham

I learned a lot about people by standing behind a a cash register. When a new store opened in the city’s shopping district, I applied for a part-time position to see what it would be like to work in retail. It turned out to be an interesting experience for me. I discovered practically every customer showed some sign of being prejudiced towards the employees, however subtle it may have been. If a person came up to the counter to ask for directions they always asked me instead of any female employee. When it came to questioning the sizes of clothing or if items matched, I was always ignored. Both men and women consistently asked only the female workers. I found the whole thing amusing; curious how people’s perceptions were formed. Since we were all on the same pay scale it did not matter to any of us. In the scheme of things what I have just described was rather minor. If I had told you the female employees were hired at a lower pay scale then the men, I am sure you would have had a stronger reaction. Sadly that still happens in today’s world. Here is a perfect example of a movie being both informative and entertaining. This dramatization of a true story was set in England during the late 1960’s, at one of the country’s biggest employers of British workers, the Ford auto plant in the city of Dagenham. Sally Hawkins (Happy-G-Lucky, Never Let Me Go) played Rita O’Grady, one of the women machinists who worked on the cars’ interiors. Besides the poor conditions and hard work, Rita discovered the company was being discriminatory towards the women. She was pushed into taking some kind of action. Except for the hard time I had with the heavy British accents, I was fully drawn into the story of the women’s plight. The costumes and sets were perfect in depicting the era. I found the high level of consistent acting made for a cohesive storytelling experience. Bob Hoskins (Hook, Snow White and the Huntsman) as union representative Albert Passingham, Miranda Richardson (The Young Victoria, Sleepy Hollow) as Secretary of State for Employment Barbara Castle and Daniel Mays (Atonement, The Bank Job) as Rita’s husband Eddie were some of the actors that stood out for me. This was a story of historical significance that could be seen equally by women and men.

 

3 1/3 stars — DVD

Advertisements

About moviejoltz

From a long line of movie afficionados, one brother was the #1 renter of movies in the country with Blockbuster, I am following in the same traditions that came before me. To balance out the long hours seated in dark movie theaters, I also teach yoga and cycling. For the past 3 years, I have correctly picked the major Oscar winners... so join me as we explore the wonder of movies and search for that perfect 4 star movie.

Posted on June 4, 2013, in Dramedy and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. I worked in retail for a while a couple of years back. Because I was older EVERYONE assumed I was buying the business and was just getting the feel of it. My boss hated this. People love to make assumptions, I thought it was funny. I looked confident but in reality I was seriously broke. A bit of bull sh#t goes a long way.
    Love your work.
    Terry

  2. you’ve seen a lot of movies! You review them well and I now know where to go to decide whether a film is worth seeing 🙂 Appreciate your visits to food for fun–thanks for stopping by the muffin-and-amazing-ice-cream posts.

    • Hi Liz and thank you for coming by to leave a comment. My philosophy is simple: life is uncertain, eat dessert first. I hope my reviews can help save you money by avoiding the poorly made films. This way you can spend it on more tasty ingredients. lol

  3. WordsFallFromMyEyes

    I love how you start with your own personal life, then move on to the movie.

    I enjoy your reviews – enjoy your honesty, and your personal style.

    • It is very kind of you to say, thank you. I spent some time mulling over if I was comfortable enough to open up about my feelings. Though I still get nervous, reading comments like yours gives me the courage to continue on. Once again, thank you for taking the time to leave your comments.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: