Flash Movie Review: If I Stay

You know it is a real love when the person looks past your perceptions of yourself and focuses on what they see in you. It may have started as an infatuation but as time lengthened the love inside of you branched out to form a bond with the other person. The connection taps into each of your reservoirs of dreams and hopes, where the common ones blend together as the single ones wait for that spark of support that will fire them up towards reality. Love brings a person startling powers. Alone, individuals would not willingly place themselves in a situation that would be painful or harmful. However, when in a relationship love spurs the person to take on or at least try to take on their significant other’s pain or suffering. I have had a couple of relationships where the person had an accident or became ill and had to be hospitalized. It was awful to see them incapacitated and in pain. I felt helpless, wishing there was something I could do to ease their agony. It was during those times that I discovered love grows stronger in a health crisis.    TRAGEDY would not change the feelings Adam, played by Jamie Blackley (The Fifth Estate, Snow White and the Huntsman); had for Mia, played by Chloe Grace Moretz (Carrie, Hugo). A gifted cellist, Mia was on course to follow her dreams when an automobile accident occurred, placing her in a coma. Adam could only hope his love would bring her back. Based on the novel, this dramatic movie had several elements that had the potential to create a moving story. The cast which included Mireille Enos (Gangster Squad, World War Z) as Mia’s mother Kat, Joshua Leonard (Higher Ground, Men of Honor) as her father Denny and Stacy Keach (Nebraska, American History X) as Gramps did the best they could with the script. Ultimately it was not enough because this picture fell flat as the scenes seemed forced and manipulative. The chemistry between Chloe and Jamie never felt strong to me; it only made things worse. One of the big issues I had was the way the story jumped from current time to past memories. They never provided an opportunity for the characters to become more than one dimensional. Compared to this past summer’s movie, “The Fault in Our Stars,” this film was a poor alternative. What made this a less enjoyable experience was the crowd at the theater; it was predominately 13-15 year old girls who were vocal throughout the movie. Geared towards them I just sat in my seat and wondered what would happen to them when they grew up and discovered love in the real world.

 

1 3/4 stars

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About moviejoltz

From a long line of movie afficionados, one brother was the #1 renter of movies in the country with Blockbuster, I am following in the same traditions that came before me. To balance out the long hours seated in dark movie theaters, I also teach yoga and cycling. For the past 3 years, I have correctly picked the major Oscar winners... so join me as we explore the wonder of movies and search for that perfect 4 star movie.

Posted on August 25, 2014, in Drama and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I didn’t think the book was all that great, either. It got such hype, but it was highly forgettable to me. I never cared whether she stayed or not.
    I’ll probably end up watching this with my 14-year-old daughter, but not at the theater.

    • I am so happy you mentioned the book; I was hoping someone could tell me about it. Thanks for coming by to leave your comments and good luck seeing the movie with your daughter. I would be curious to hear both of your reviews of the film.

  2. I’ve read the book. The story was pretty much simple but in reality I was amazed on how the author was able to capture the events/feelings of being in a coma. I can relate to the patient and the love ones who are on the other side. I have had patients who responded well (and badly) while recovering at the ICU because of human contact (and lack of it). I have interacted with family members who are hopeful, anxious and grieving at the same time. And yes, I did talk to my patients even if they were not responsive. I know they hear me. Now, I don’t know about the movie. I haven’t seen it but this kind of drama is never fiction for me. It’s was a part of my everyday life. 🙂

    • Thank you so much for taking the time to write your comments. I have always been fascinated with the coma patient connection to those around them. I was told they still hear everything. If you do see this film I would love to hear back from you to see what your take was on the film version of the book. Thanks again for the insight.

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