Flash Movie Review: The Belko Experiment

THERE was a stir in the air but the windows were closed. He could sense the shift as if the air around him had suddenly become electrified, where the fine hair on the arms stands up at attention. Afraid to turn around he remained looking forward at a downward glance. This was not an unfamiliar feeling to him; he only hoped he wasn’t going to be today’s victim. In a matter of a few seconds he knew he was somewhat safe. There was that one cry out for help before the victim was pounced on by the bullies in the room. It started out with taunting remarks about the victim’s appearance, quickly expanding in scope to include unfamiliar family members and lack of physical prowess. Other boys standing around had a choice, but not really. They could voice their opposition to the attack, but none of them would do it for fear the focus of the attack would redirect towards them. All they could do was pretend to be part of the bullies pack and hope they could leave the area unscathed. It pretty much is a no win situation for the target; they could either pass out, hoping that would stop the attackers or pray for a faculty member to walk into the room.     THIS scenario is something I have experienced both in school and out on the streets. I am always stunned how the majority of people witnessing such an attack pretend nothing is wrong or just as bad, bystanders join in for their own amusement. I remember one time while riding public transportation a guy started a fight with another passenger. Those that were sitting nearby got out of their seats and went to the opposite side of the train car to look for another seat. The riders that were sitting further away never looked up; continuing their gaze downward, out the windows or just closed their eyes as if they were pretending to be asleep. Considering there were only two people fighting in the full train car, why couldn’t everyone work together in disabling the 2 fighters? I am reminded of that quote, “The strong will inherit the earth.” This quote is just as applicable for this action, horror thriller.     SEVENTY employees working at their company’s Bogota location found themselves locked inside their office building one day. They thought it was a mistake until a voice came over the building’s loudspeaker system. Starring John Gallagher Jr. (Short Term 12, 10 Cloverfield Lane) as Mike “Michael” Milch, Tony Goldwyn (Ghost, The Mechanic) as Barry Norris, Adria Arjona (Person of Interest-TV, Emerald City-TV) as Leandra and John C. McGinley (Platoon, The Rock) as Wendell Dukes; this movie essentially was a blood fest. There were multiple, violent scenes filled with blood. Surprisingly I did not mind the story’s concept; maybe because of what I experienced and witnessed in the past. It was that kernel of understanding that kept me somewhat involved with this picture. Those of you who know my tastes know I am not a fan of excessive violence; after awhile I found the story going on automatic with repetitive scenes. It was not until almost the end where the turn in events engaged me once again. I am afraid this picture will die quickly against the recent blockbuster films out there.

 

1 ¾ stars

 

 

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About moviejoltz

From a long line of movie afficionados, one brother was the #1 renter of movies in the country with Blockbuster, I am following in the same traditions that came before me. To balance out the long hours seated in dark movie theaters, I also teach yoga and cycling. For the past 3 years, I have correctly picked the major Oscar winners... so join me as we explore the wonder of movies and search for that perfect 4 star movie.

Posted on March 21, 2017, in Thriller and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I’m so sorry you had to endure that in your past. Good review but would probably only watch online when it comes out.

  2. What a touch of suspence.

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