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Flash Movie Review: The Hateful Eight

There was a time where it was considered a palace. With Moorish trappings and an abundance of wrought iron railings the building stood tall over all other ones within several blocks. I was lucky enough to get inside of it, though it had lost its moniker by then. This place was a movie palace; an old fashioned theater that had one single enormous screen, covered by a set of red velvet drapes. The rows of seats were bolted to a sloping floor that looked like a swelling wave, particularly if one stood either at the front or back of them. The theater was built decades before anyone thought of putting stadium seating into an auditorium. I remember the time I visited this place and was fascinated with the fine details of the theater lobby. There were candelabras on the walls with fake candles that looked like they were dripping white wax from their amber colored, flickering lightbulbs. To the right of the candy counter was a grand staircase that swirled up to a balcony that was perched just below the mosaic tiled ceiling. Before the movie started there as a low audible rumble throughout the theater. Slowly rising up from the stage in front of those velvet drapes, was a huge pipe organ being played by a man dressed in a tuxedo; it was wild. I imagined that in its heyday when a new movie was being shown in this theater it was an event…and today’s movie could have easily been on the schedule.    BOUNTY hunter John Ruth, played by Kurt Russell (Tombstone, Death Proof), and his prisoner Daisy Domergue, played by Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Machinist, Road to Perdition), were forced to hole up in a roadside establishment until a winter blizzard passed by. They were not the only ones who had the same idea. Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino (Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill: Vol. 1 & 2), this mystery thriller was an experience to be seen. Nearly 3 hours long, there were no movie preview trailers; the film started on time with an overture and there was a planned intermission. The crowd was handed a complimentary program; I was taken aback. The filming  and soundtrack were incredible to see and hear as the story was set in Wyoming. With Samuel L. Jackson (Chi-Raq, The Avengers franchise) as Major Marquis Warren and Bruce Dern (Nebraska, Monster) as General Sandy Smithers among the cast, this film had a great script with wonderful dialog. Yes, there was what I refer to as the Tarantino blood and violence scenes but there was not as much as his previous films. The story took some time to get into because it started out slow with long drawn out shots. I felt some scenes could have been eliminated or at least shortened. As with his past films Quentin did a beautiful job of paying homage to past celebrated directors. Watching this film festival winning western was truly an experience. There were scenes with blood and violence.

 

3 1/4 stars

 

 

 

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Flash Movie Review: Room

There is this saying that tells you if you get stuck with lemons then make lemonade. Sadly my lemonade tends to taste like apple cider vinegar, not all the time but enough where I tend to expect it. In my circle of friends we tend to say, “They were born with a lucky horseshoe up their rear end,” to describe someone who is charmed. I have one friend who on the average wins a prize 75% of the time for all the sweepstakes and raffles they have entered, it is uncanny. On the other hand I know I am more likely making a cash donation to the organization. For example there was one time I went to teach a yoga class and when I walked into the club, the front desk told me all classes were cancelled due to a power outage. I did wonder why no one bothered to call me to let me know; but there was no reason to point it out to my fellow employees. So I decided to use the restroom before making the trip back home. It could not have been more than a minute or two, but by the time I came back to the front lobby I was informed the tornado siren had gone off and no one was allowed to leave the building. We were all stuck in the building’s windowless hallway for 20-25 minutes. Gratefully it turned out to be a false alarm but there was no lemonade to be made that night by me. But do you know what, all of that along with any other similar situation I may have had did not matter after I saw what was taking place in this extraordinary drama.    FIVE year old Jack, played by Jacob Tremblay (Before I Wake, My Mother’s Future Husband-TV movie), was loved and nurtured by his Ma, played by Brie Larson (Short Term 12, The Spectacular Now). In their tiny space that Ma named Room, Jack had no idea there was a whole world outside of the windowless shed they were locked in all these years. Less than halfway through this film I already knew what rating this movie deserved and I meant deserved. Part thriller, part suspense, part horror, part intense drama; this was a movie watching experience that took me away. Brie and Jacob were so unbelievably real that I could not stop tearing up through sections of this picture. Even the supporting cast actors like Joan Allen (Death Race, The Contender) as Nancy and William H. Macy (The Sessions, Pleasantville) as Robert were important players in the story. Based on the bestselling book, I have nothing negative to say about this amazing film. The directing did such a beautiful job of taking the viewers through this hilly, rough terrain of a script. The bottom line about this movie is this: it will be a major Oscar contender. I hope everyone gets to see this film.

 

4 stars

 

 

 

Flash Movie Review: The Railway Man

Though the physical and verbal blows ended a long time ago they are still remembered. The changing landscape of an aging body may cover up the dents of abuse but the tremors remain just beneath the surface. Pain never discriminates, it only knows to dig toward one’s heart. It was not until I was in my 20s before I realized there was supposed to be space between my shoulders and ears. I can still remember when a friend or relative expressed kindness with an innocent physical gesture; my whole body would tense up. It was not something that was done consciously, more instinctive or something I learned at a young age. In addition each verbal assault can be recalled verbatim to this day. They dominate any positive comments I may receive by shoving them to a junk room in my mind. To say it takes a lot of work to correct this circuitry in the brain would be putting it mildly. Based on a true story former British army officer Eric Lomax, played by Colin Firth (A Single Man, The King’s Speech), was someone I could relate to in this film festival winning movie. Years have past since he was forced to work on a railroad for Japanese troops while he was a prisoner of war. His wife Patti, played by Nicole Kidman (The Hours, The Golden Compass), had no idea what her husband had to endure during the war because he never talked about it. She only knew something was not right. Nicole and Colin were beautifully suited to play husband and wife. From their performance I was easily convinced they were a married couple; that was how commanding they were in playing their characters. Stellan Skarsgard (Good Will Hunting, The Avengers) as Finlay had a curious role in which he was well suited for the part. The director had a good eye for setting up scenes where I rather enjoyed the contrast between the young and older Eric characters. Where this film let me down was the script. I found myself becoming bored through parts, after going from intense scenes to average ones and back. Having only seen one trailer for this picture, I imagined there would have been more dynamic emotions and energy on display. In my opinion the story warranted it. One need not have to relate to the subject matter to know there was a powerful story here.  It just was not executed to its best advantage.

 

2 1/2 stars

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