Flash Movie Review: Crimson Peak

When one experiences a traumatic change in their life, the person should hold off on making any life altering decisions. I remember hearing this advice a long time ago and did not quite comprehend the magnitude of it. In the past when something rough happened to me I used to binge on food; I know, a classic case of stuffing one’s feelings. I have not done that in manny, many years. As I matured I started to understand the meaning of that wisdom and would force myself to have a pause in my life, to contemplate the issue and look for a solution or allow myself to go through the grieving process. There was one horrible breakup I went through where I did not leave the house for a few days, doing a marathon of movies on DVD. It actually helped me come to terms with the changes that took place. I realized I did not have control over them, learned how to acknowledge my feelings then worked at eventually letting them go. No one can tell you what to do during such times; I believe a person has to come to terms with their emotions. Though I will say I appreciated listening to the different advice my friends were offering me. Unfortunately I had a friend who was not in a space to listen to others when her long term boyfriend decided to end their relationship. She spiraled down into a deep depression. However in a matter of several weeks she all of a sudden introduced me to her new boyfriend. I thought it was rather quick and became more concerned after a couple of months later she told me she was going to marry him. I knew this was going to be trouble just as I knew there was trouble brewing in this dramatic fantasy film.    AFTER the tragic loss of her father Edith Cushing, played by Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, Jane Eyre), married and moved out of the country with businessman Thomas Sharpe, played by Tom Hiddleston (Thor franchise, Only Lovers Left Alive), to live on his estate. His mansion came with some dark secrets. Written and directed by Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim), this horror film was utterly gorgeous with sumptuous sets and period pieced costumes. The actors including Jessica Chastain (The Martian, A Most Violent Year) as Lucille Sharpe and Charlie Hunnam (Pacific Rim, Children of Men) as Dr. Alan McMichael were all wonderful in spite of the dull story. With such elaborate sets and scenery I really had hoped the story was going to be a strong gothic suspense drama. There was very little intensity throughout the film as if everything had fallen into a middle of the road type of mentality. Not to take anything away from the actors but due to the script, I found the house to be one of the strongest characters out of the movie.

 

2 1/3 stars

 

 

 

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About moviejoltz

From a long line of movie afficionados, one brother was the #1 renter of movies in the country with Blockbuster, I am following in the same traditions that came before me. To balance out the long hours seated in dark movie theaters, I also teach yoga and cycling. For the past 3 years, I have correctly picked the major Oscar winners... so join me as we explore the wonder of movies and search for that perfect 4 star movie.

Posted on October 20, 2015, in Fantasy/Sci-Fi and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. Interesting. My friend saw this is London the other day and was raving about how much he enjoyed it. I won’t be able to see this until it’s on the small screen anyway. It’s interesting you mention the house being the most vivid character as I do find that del Toro is increasingly more talented at generating atmospherics than he is at conveying character.

  2. Rebounds don’t always work 😀

  3. I totally agree on every count. The acting is superb from the stars down to the secondary characters, particularly Jim Beaver as the father of Edith. But, they can’t do more than convey real emotion as the story itself is rather pedestrian, as you can see what is coming before it happens. Yet, despite the predictability, the sets (oh that house, so spooky), the period costume design (equally creepy), and the special effects (the scene at the sink, turn away) are all done quite well, and help make the film better than average. Still, the potential for what could have been are all there. So, it’s a shame Guillermo del Toro and Matthew Robbins both decidedly settled for nothing more than capitalizing on the pre-Halloween crowd to provide the box-office, instead of challenging themselves and the audience with a story worthy of a masterpiece.

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