Flash Movie Review: Miss You Already

There are various apps and computer programs that can show us an older or younger version of ourselves. In fact I read somehwere optical stores use a program that shows the customer how they will look wearing the frames they picked out before they order new glasses, which I think is a brilliant idea. I know I do not need a program to remind me how I looked when I was younger; I have childhood friends who remind me. Funny thing though I can do the same thing to them. Depending on what they may be wearing or the situation, I can look at them and see them when they had a full head of hair or when they were taller with a straighter posture. Having spent most of our lives together we may not have noticed the aging process compared to someone who has not seen any of us in let us say a decade or longer. I truly feel fortunate that there are people around me who know me sometimes better than I know myself. They are like road markers on my life’s journey, who can confirm or remind me of the changes that have taken place in me. Looking at the younger generation in each of our families, we can spot the seeds of lifelong friendships forming between relatives and friends. Some of the qualities that are associated to a strong bond between friends can be sensitivity, empathy, non-judgemental and concern. I can say anything to any of my close friends and know I will not be judged or ridiculed. Those challenges or what some people say curveballs that life throws you do not seem so insurmountable when there is a childhood friend standing by your side.    LIFELONG friends Jess and Milly, played by Drew Barrymore (Whip It, Music and Lyrics) and Toni Collette (The Way Way Back, Little Miss Sunshine), have been there for each other no matter what was going on in each of their lives. Their relationship was about to be challenged when two events started to take place from opposite sides of the spectrum. This comedic drama was fortunate in the casting of Toni and Drew as best friends because they were totally believable in their roles. Even the supporting cast of Dominic Cooper (Need for Speed, The Devil’s Double) as Kit and Paddy Considine (In America, Cinderella Man) as Jago was exceptional. I appreciated the honesty in the script; some events were handled in a way that made them easily relatable for the viewers. There were parts where I felt the writers dropped the ball to just manipulate us, however. I almost want to say to force us to tear up; but the acting smoothed some of that out. There have been a couple of recent films that had a similar story line that was better done; however, the acting here was the sweet spot of this romantic emotional story. It would not be a surprise if after seeing this film you felt like you were part of the women’s friendship.

 

2 1/2 stars

 

 

 

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About moviejoltz

From a long line of movie afficionados, one brother was the #1 renter of movies in the country with Blockbuster, I am following in the same traditions that came before me. To balance out the long hours seated in dark movie theaters, I also teach yoga and cycling. For the past 3 years, I have correctly picked the major Oscar winners... so join me as we explore the wonder of movies and search for that perfect 4 star movie.

Posted on November 11, 2015, in Dramedy and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 9 Comments.

  1. Hi! I was just wondering what you have been up to. Maybe you were too anesthetized by this last film to post?

  2. This is a dilemma movie for me: Considine is one of my favourites and I’m quite partial to Collette; I’m meh about Barrymore; but I loathe Cooper. Since I won’t be seeing it until it’s on the small screen anyway so I likely will give it a gander.

    • Why do you loathe Cooper? By chance have you see The Devil’s Double? I agree with you, I always enjoy Colette’s performance. Thanks for the comments.

      • Well I don’t loathe him as a person, of course, because I don’t know him personally. I just find him to be very flat as an actor, his performances dull as an old spoon, very amateur, and that then lifts me out of the film all the time as I’m too aware I’m watching actors doing make believe than being gripped by an immersive plot. No, I’ve not seen the Devil’s Double because I couldn’t put myself through a film in which he’s so omnipresent.

      • Thank you for the explanation.

  3. This looks like something I would watch on the small screen, for sure. Thank you for the review!

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