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Flash Movie Review: What Men Want

WHEN I WAS A MUCH YOUNGER BOY I thought there were many differences between men and women. Maybe it was the times, the environment or the teachings; but outside the physical characteristics both sexes were treated differently. I never understood why the color blue was designated as a masculine color and pink a feminine one. I was taught to open doors for women and to give up my seat on the bus or train for a woman who is standing. Rarely do I see either of these things being done these days. If a female drops something it was ok to pick it up for her; however, if a male dropped something it was okay to ignore it. To pick something up for another male was akin to telling them they were weak and puny. Seriously, this is what I was led to believe. And of course, there is that thing about showing emotions, especially sadness and tears. Heaven forbid you are watching a sad movie in your film class and tear up; your classmates will pounce on you for being a weak sissy. These are only a couple of the things that I encountered in my youth; I am glad I grew up.      HERE ARE A FEW THINGS I see today: both women and men saying ignorant things, both sexes displaying prejudices, men and women competing on the same team and both capable of being poor drivers. In other words, in my small world I see very little difference between men and women. As such, I treat them the same. If either sex drops something I will pick it up for them. In my fitness classes I do not even see males and females; I see people working hard and doing their best. With the participants in my classes ranging in age from 16 to 80 years old, I see the younger generations have a different mindset about the opposite sex than the older members. It is encouraging to me because I believe everyone should be on equal footing and treated equally. In the locker room the only negative remarks I have heard about the opposite sex have come from older men. In my opinion there is a lack of respect on their part, based on their comments. I do not think they have a clue that their attitude is part of the problem. For all I know they may not even know what a woman needs and who knows, maybe the same thing goes on in the women’s locker room and they don’t know what men need. This was not the case for the woman in this dramatic, romantic fantasy.      NO MATTER HOW HARD SHE WORKED Ali Davis, played by Taraji P. Henson (Proud Mary, No Good Deed), never felt like she was being treated fairly at her job. Could it be because she was the only female sports agent? This remake of the male version also starred Josh Brener (The Internship, The Belko Experiment) as Brandon Wallace, Aldis Hodge (Straight Outta Compton) as Will, Max Greenfield (The Big Short, About Alex) as Kevin Myrtle and Brian Bosworth (The Longest Yard, Three Kings) as Nick Ivers. I do not know when this movie was completed but a part of me had to wonder while watching it if it was purposely written to appeal to our current events between the sexes. I felt the script had holes in it causing me to be bored. If it was not for Taraji’s valiant effort to get as much as possible out of the script, I would have been even more bored. Gratefully her acting kept this picture alive, along with the few scenes that I found humorous. I do not know how much you will gain from watching this film; I think you would learn more from one of my classes.

 

2 stars

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Flash Movie Review: The Glass Castle

THE ONLY PEOPLE who were embarrassed by the couple’s accents were their children. To everyone else the mother and father talked that way because they were European. As far as I knew there was no derogatory intent by saying someone was European, Asian or by some other region of the world. For me I was intrigued with the fact that a friend would have a living relative from a different country; since most of mine had come to the United States either at birth or were dead by the time I was born. Some of the children were able to speak to their parents in their native tongue but they only wanted to do so when no one else was around. It is funny though; by the time these kids reached the grade levels were a foreign language was required in school, they usually got top grades. I would be lying if I did not say I was a bit envious since I struggled with the language I chose to learn.     THERE COMES AN age in a child’s life where I think it is natural for them to feel embarrassed at times by their parents’ actions. I think it is just a generational thing, like styles of clothing or genres of music. Each generation wants to own something unique to them that was not from their parents’ generation. Hanging out at a friend’s house, it was not unusual for a parent to come check on us. However, some parents would ask questions or try to fit into our conversation. At this point the parent’s child would do or say something to try to get their parent to leave. I remember one parent who would come into the basement where we were listening to music and try to dance to it. This always produced a groan from their son or daughter. In the scheme of things, compared to what was shown in this dramatic film based on a true story, dancing around would be the very least thing to be embarrassed about.    GROWING UP IN a constant state of change and disarray had effected the children of Rex and Rose Mary, played by Woody Harrelson (War for the Planets of the Apes, Wilson) and Naomi Watts (The Book of Henry, Demolition), in ways that would last for a lifetime. This biographical film also starred Brie Larson (Free Fire, Room) as Jeannette, Ella Anderson (The Boss, Mother’s Day) as a young Jeanette and Max Greenfield (The Big Short, New Girl-TV) as David. The story was so bizarre to me that I wondered if the scenes I was seeing really happened in the life of this family. I thought the acting was wonderful, especially from Woody and Brie. At first I was not too crazy about the jumping back and forth in time method, but realized at some point it made better sense to tell the story that way. It emphasized the way the adult versions were acting in their scenes. The issue I had with this picture was the latter part; it seemed as if things were tied up in a quick and easy way. Having not read the book, it just came across as not having the realness of the other parts of the story. I almost want to say it was being painted with a happier ending just to please the movie goers. The book I am willing to bet is more intense than this film. Not that anyone needs to be embarrassed with the final product here; the story still is unbelievable and in my opinion sets a different standard for defining a dysfunctional family.

 

2 ¾ stars

 

 

Flash Movie Review: Hello, My Name is Doris

Maybe it is my own prejudice but I tend to be suspicious of individuals who date the same type of looking people. You know, like dating only blonde haired people or tall people or those who wear glasses; there are all kinds and though I may not understand it I respect it. I never could comprehend why a certain color of hair or actually any particular physical feature would contribute to hopefully a long lasting relationship. Sometimes I will joke with a friend and ask them what they would do if the person they are dating decided to dye their hair or get contact lenses. They usually tell me it would not make a difference but I have seen the pattern and know eventually they will end the relationship. For me the same thing applies to age differences because I believe our age only represents how long we have been alive, nothing else. I ask you, do you understand what it means when someone says, “act your age”? How should a 72 year old act or a 23 year old? For me as long as the person is not harming anyone and enjoying life, they can do whatever they want to do. A short time ago there was a lot of buzz about older woman dating younger men; they were referred to as “cougars.” Funny, when it was an older man and a younger woman there never seemed to be the same type of humor. There were several television programs that turned these types of relationships into a comedy. Sure there are times where a wide gap between a couple’s ages can result in amusement; however, why would anyone care about someone dating an older or younger person. I have encountered people older than me who acted like little kids just as I have met younger folk who act much older. I will let you decide what you think about the main characters in this dramatic comedy.   AFTER taking care of her mother for many years shy yet colorful Doris Miller, played by Sally Fields (Mrs. Doubtfire, Lincoln), found a way to come out of her shell. This film festival winning romance had a wonderful script that came across with honesty and respect. Included in the cast was Max Greenfield (The Big Short, New Girl-TV) as John Fremont, Wendi McLendon-Covey (Bridesmaids, Blended) as Cynthia and Tyne Daly (The Autumn Heart, Judging Amy-TV) as Roz. I thought the entire cast did a great job, but Sally was outstanding in her role. It was just great watching Sally in this character; she came across as a real person. The mix of humor and sadness blended together perfectly, never letting the story turn sappy or maudlin. The pacing of the story never allowed for any boredom to set in; plus, I enjoyed the way the writers played with the generational differences. Whether “younger” or “older” this film can be enjoyed by all ages.

 

3 stars

 

 

 

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