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Flash Movie Review: The Lobster

There are some people who are uncomfortable being the 3rd wheel of a group, others do not even think of it. I suppose it depends on what is going on at the time. For those unfamiliar with the term “3rd wheel” let me explain. A third wheel is a person who joins a couple for a social occasion. There rarely is a time when I feel uncomfortable being considered the 3rd wheel. When a friend becomes part of being a couple what do you do? Do you stop socializing with them just because they have a significant other? I don’t think so. We still get together. Now I will say there are times when a friend may be dating someone that I find offensive, but I remain cordial and just deal with it. I can remember though a couple of times where I was aware I was the odd man out. For example, a friend of mine won free tickets to an amusement park and invited me to join him and the person he was dating. Walking and eating in the park was okay but after a while I was getting tired of always having to ride an attraction by myself or with a stranger seated next to me because my friend and his date had to ride together so they could hold hands or hug. It was not a big deal but I did make a mental note to be aware of it if the circumstances were reversed and I was the one in a relationship. If I had time I would tell you about a friend of mine who would come visit me in college and bring along her boyfriend, so they could share the extra bed in my dorm room; talk about being uncomfortable. Do you find it as odd as I do how some people act differently when they are in a relationship?   IMAGINE living in a society where you had 45 days to find a partner otherwise you would get turned into an animal. This was one of the most absurdist romantic comedies I have seen in a long time. Starring Colin Farrell (Phone Booth, Miami Vice) as David, Rachel Weisz (Oz the Great and Powerful, The Fountain) as short sighted woman and John C. Reilly (Chicago, Carnage) as lisping man; I had to wonder what the actors must have thought while making this film. There were parts of the story that made strong satirical statements; others were humorous, while some were just odd. I think viewers will have a strong reaction to this film festival winner; they will either love it or hate it. This was confirmed for me by the audience’s reactions I heard after the movie was over. I have to say I had a strong negative reaction to the end of the story; but before I got to that point, I cannot say I was entertained as much as I was curious while watching this romantic comedic drama. The interesting thing about this picture is how it offers something to think about whether you are presently single or in a relationship.

 

2 ¾ stars

 

 

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Flash Movie Review: Spectre

As I walked in the odor of old rubber was still there minus the cigarette smoke. To the left the bar had been enlarged with a small variety of craft beers. When I was younger they only served 2 brands from 2 spigots. There were familiar sounds playing out though some of them seemed more muted than what I remembered. However one particular sound still stood out whenever a ball was rolled down the bowling lane. It was the sound of hope and anticipation for the initial smack against the standing pins that would then scatter out of the way. The old bowling alley I used to go to had gone under renovation. Across all the lanes now hung TV monitors that kept everyone’s scores automatically, accented with colorful animations for each ball thrown. I did miss the fan vent in the middle of the ball return carousel that would blow cool air on the bowlers’ outstretched hand. It never occurred to me that it was used to keep a bowler’s hands dry; I assumed it was to keep one’s palm clean from dust or dirt. Just as I wrote that sentence it dawned on me how odd that must be because after every game my hands always had a dull black residue over them from the ancient bowling balls. It took me no time at all to get into the swing  of things and have a good time in this updated place; I had enough memories to mix in with the new things done to the bowling alley. I had similar feelings with this action thriller.    KEEPING a promise he made James Bond, played by Daniel Craig (Cowboys & Aliens, Defiance), would discover a trail of events that were created especially for him but had major consequences for everyone else. This latest adventure story in the movie franchise had a big budget to film in various locations around the world which were fun to see. Pretty much the story followed the requirements for what we all expect in a James Bond movie: intense fight scenes, hi-tech gadgets, a love interest and a diabolical enemy. But with a running time of 2 hours 28 minutes, the story was bloated with scenes that were predictable and felt like the actors were going through the motions. I thought Lea Seydoux (Blue is the Warmest Color, The Grand Budapest Hotel) as Madeleine Swann and Ben Whishaw (I’m Not There, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer) as Q were exceptionally good in their roles. What bugged me was casting the skilled actor Christoph Waltz (Carnage, Django Unchained) as Oberhauser then giving him such a poorly written role. This was par for the course since there were fun parts to this movie that played off my fond memories of the older Bond films, but then they had to deal with lackluster scenes. I had read Daniel said he would rather slit his wrists then do another Bond film which explained him looking tired. This is not the way I wanted to remember this James Bond.

 

2 3/4 stars

 

 

 

Flash Movie Review: Blue is the Warmest Color

There is something special about one’s first love. I am not talking about a school crush; it is the first serious love where you think you could spend your entire life with that one incredible person. The reason you want to be with them is because of the way you feel around them; a change comes over you. As you near them; an invisible aromatic cloud swirls around you, making your nostrils quiver. At first contact your skin ripples with electric sparks as you willingly fall into this inviting hug, that feels as if it is enveloping you into the folds of a soft warm comforter. You take every new memory that the two of you have created and store it in a velvet lined room of your heart, with walls impervious to pain…or at least you thought so. I cannot recall the last time I was so emotionally drained from watching a romantic movie, such as this Cannes Film Festival winning film. Adele Exarchopoulos (La Rafle, Boxes) played young Adele, who was on the verge of discovering the intoxication of a first love. The jolt that awakened her was in the form of blue haired Emma, played by Lea Seydoux (Midnight in Paris, Inglourious Basterds). Adele’s journey into love would bring her into a world of new revelations. The acting in this dramatic movie was exceptional with a rawness and realness that went beyond most other films I have seen. I could not take my eyes off of Adele as she conveyed every emotion without a filter. This movie is not without some challenges, however. Running for nearly 3 hours, I found some scenes were unduly drawn out. Tighter editing would have helped in this matter.  Another issue was the explicit sexual scenes. I am aware some people are uncomfortable seeing any type of strong physical intimacy, so this movie may not fit your comfort level. What took me some time to realize was the amazing job the director showed in Adele’s growth from young innocence to an assertive adult woman. Did he need three hours to accomplish it?  I do not think so; but the fact that this is one of two chapters, I will be curious to see how memories of her first love propel Adele forward in life. French language with English subtitles.

 

3 1/4 stars

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